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ERIC Number: ED219231
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Apr
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
A Meta-Analysis of Research on Preservice and Inservice Science Teacher Education Practices Designed to Produce Outcomes Associated with Inquiry Strategy.
Sweitzer, Gary L.
The discrepancy between educators' expectations for inquiry behavior and the actual status of such behavior (teachers feeling more comfortable teaching facts and feeling ill-prepared to guide students in inquiry learning) prompted a quantitative assessment of the existing research (reported between 1965 and 1980 in doctoral dissertations and journals) on training outcomes associated with inquiry teaching behaviors and the techniques and procedures used to obtain them. Meta-analysis accomplished this assessment and studies (N=68) were selected that had at least one outcome associated with inquiry strategy (knowledge of science processes, inquiry instructional strategy, indirect verbal behavior, accepting interpersonal behaviors, increased wait-time questioning behavior, higher cognitive level questioning, and discovery instructional strategy). Relevant variables were identified and coded into six major categories: 1) study form/design characteristics; 2) teacher/teacher trainee characteristics; 3) student characteristics; 4) treatment characteristics; 5) outcome characteristics; and 6) effect size characteristics (standardization of mean differences between treatment and control groups). Results among others indicated the teacher outcome most frequently measured was knowledge of science processes followed by indirect verbal behavior. (Author/JN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Meta Analysis; Science Education Research
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (55th, Chicago, IL, April 5-8, 1982). This research was conducted as part of a larger meta-analysis project initiated at the University of Colorado.