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ERIC Number: ED219012
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Non-Cognitive Variables in Predicting Academic Success by Race.
Tracey, Terence J.; Sedlacek, William E.
A questionnaire designed to assess seven non-cognitive variables found to be related to college success particularly for minority students (Sedlacek and Brooks, 1976) was administered to two successive samples of incoming freshmen at the University of Maryland, College Park. The Non-Cognitive Questionnaire (NCQ) consists to two nominal items relating to educational expectations, 18 Likert-type items relating to expectations about college and self-assessment, and three open-ended questions relating to present goals, past accomplishments, and offices held/groups belonged to. The sample of 1,644 freshmen entering in 1979 and 478 freshmen entering in 1980 were administered the NCQ during summer orientation. The properties of the instrument were examined to determine if the responses vary across the races and whether the items are content valid in their ability to tap the seven non-cognitive dimensions: positive self-concept, realistic self-appraisal, understanding of and ability to deal with racism, preference for long-range goals over short-term or immediate needs, availability of a strong support person, successful leadership experience, and demonstrated community service. The results showed reliability and construct validity for the instrument. For whites, the non-cognitive dimensions of self-confidence, preference for long-range goals over short-term or immediate needs, and realistic self-appraisal were most strongly related to grade point average. For blacks, the only non-cognitive variables that were related to grade point average were positive self-concept and realistic self-appraisal. For whites the NCQ significantly adds to the prediction of grades, while for blacks it is related to both grades and enrollment status. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Maryland Univ., College Park. Counseling Center.
Identifiers: Noncognitive Attributes; University of Maryland College Park
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, March 19-23, 1982).