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ERIC Number: ED218391
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar-20
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Idea of Resistance in Education: A Critique.
Reeves, Joyce King
This paper discusses resistance in education as expressed in white working-class girls' reactions to sex role socialization, children's play, minority children's behavior in inner city schools, and the resistance of female faculty in institutions of higher education. The paper takes off from issues addressed in some papers presented at a research symposium on resistance in education. Observing that some of the papers draw on Eugene Genovese's conceptualization of accommodation and resistance in explaining slavery, the author cautions against uncritically accepting Genovese's interpretation. Genovese's use of the idea of paternalism to explain slavery and the slaves' widespread accommodation and weak resistance to slavery is thought to ignore important factors such as racism and the sexual exploitation of slave women. It is suggested that Genovese tends to view slave resistance as an attribute of personality rather than as a collective and individually conscious phenomenon with political and economic implications. The author of this paper shows how the broader interpretation of resistance applies in the educational situations described in J. Anyon's paper on cultural influences in working-class girls' resistance, Nancy King's analysis of children's play as a force for altering school social relations, and Marcella Lingham's discussion of minority children's resistance behavior in the instructional process. It is suggested that information on resistance in education would be useful in promoting equality for minorities in education. (Author/MJL)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Accommodation Theory; Resistance (Psychology); Social Theory; Working Class
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, March 20, 1982).