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ERIC Number: ED218371
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Improving Achievement for Pupils of Low Socio-Economic Strata: The Gamble We Must Take.
Curtis, Jonathan; And Others
The importance of summer instruction for children from lower socioeconomic strata (SES) is emphasized by research which shows that the gap in achievement levels between higher SES children and lower SES children that is evident during the regular school year becomes greater during the summer. An examination of summer school programs in Austin, Texas, and evaluative reports on other summer schools suggests that participation in summer school is not effective in raising academic achievement on the elementary level. These findings indicate a need to experiment with new summer instruction programs in school districts committed to improving academic achievement among low SES children. Practical experience and information from summer school reports identify some possible sources of poor performance during summer school sessions, among which are: 1) time constraints; 2) lack of organization; 3) minimal expectations among students and teachers; 4) lack of continuity between regular school and summer school; 5) a disproportionately large number of participants from low income families; 6) poor measurement techniques; and 7) poor attendance. Summer instruction may be made more effective by: 1) extending the duration of summer school; 2) broadening teacher and student expectations; 3) emphasizing basic skills and major content areas; 4) providing greater student motivation; 5) careful planning; 6) increasing staff size; and 7) efficient evaluation. (MJL)
Publication Type: Reports - General; Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Austin Independent School District TX
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, 1982). Tables marginally legible due to small print.