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ERIC Number: ED217802
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Apr
Pages: 66
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Leadership in Higher Education: Consequences of Career Commitments.
Mark, Sandra Fay
Men and women in higher education administration were studied to determine the nature of self-orientation, family orientation, and career orientation. Of 900 female and male subjects randomly selected from national data bases and stratified according to sex and administrative level, 561 responded, and 40 percent of the sample were nuns and priests. The Higher Education Career Questionnaire, which includes 1 self-orientation scale, 4 family-orientation scales, and 10 career orientation scales, was administered. Women and men were found to differ with respect to self, family, and career, although the pattern of results was complex. Females, compared to males, had significantly higher self-orientation scores at the two lowest administrative levels and experienced a greater amount of crises and conflict. Married subjects experienced more conflict than singles and monastics, whereas monastics had the highest degree of life satisfaction. Marital status was the most significant factor differentiating subjects on each of the four family-orientation scales. Married subjects reported the highest negative effects of family, but monastic subjects reported the highest positive effects of family, and singles the lowest on this scale. For a significant majority of female college presidents (monastics), family was found to operate in a supportive, positive way that was not the case for married or single subjects. Nine of the 10 career-orientation scales had significant results: females compared to males reported their careers were more important to them, perceived their careers in more positive terms, had greater limits on job mobility, and perceived the positive consequences of their careers more highly. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Higher Education Career Questionnaire
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association (Baltimore, MD, April 14-17, 1982).