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ERIC Number: ED217213
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 34
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Preparation Programs for Educators in Corporate Settings.
Heinich, Robert
As more and more of its graduates became employed in training and development in business and industry, rather than in instructional systems development in the public schools, the Instructional Systems Technology (IST) progam at Indiana University decided to conduct a needs assessment to determine how its programs could better prepare its graduates for their jobs. A survey of recent graduates, regarding their preparation, produced responses from 13 persons who were employed in training programs in business and industry. Analysis of these responses revealed that graduates would have liked more preparation in the following areas: writing print training materials, budget management/development, understanding organizational behavior, management of training teams, management of training programs, politics of the business world, video tape production, and effecting organizational change. In addition, a study was conducted by an IST doctoral candidate to determine what a panel of 62 people who possessed advanced degrees and were involved in business and industry training programs saw as needs of the degree programs. Areas considered important for study by the panelists were instructional development, product design and development, learning theory, basic communications, evaluation, business theory, and background skills and competencies. Based on these two studies, a master's degree in training and development was proposed for the Indiana University School of Education. (The degree requirements and proposed curriculum are included in this report.) (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Indiana; Instructional Systems Technology Program
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, March 19, 1982). Appendix will not reproduce well due to light print.