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ERIC Number: ED216991
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Jun
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Our Global Future: Implications for Social Studies Education in the United States.
Tucker, Jan L.
The purpose of this paper is to probe the relationship between the emerging global context of life for citizens in the United States and the further development of the field of social studies. The paper first examines the concept of the world problematique, described as the sudden realization of the world as a global system with complex problems and no apparent solutions. There is a global revolution of rising expectations worldwide which contains both hope and despair. The hope springs mainly from within developing nations, where the majority of people are striving to attain a minimal level of physical and psychological security. Typically, the despair emanates from those in the already industrialized nations who see an inevitable clash between modernization and the reality of finite resources, and who may also believe that the only conceivable solutions to this dilemma will destroy the political, social, and cultural freedoms known in the industrialized nations of the West. For social studies educators in the United States, the dilemma of modernization versus finite resources raises agonizing questions. For example, shall social studies choose to foster the precepts and concepts of the now burgeoning revolution of rising expectations? Or shall it choose to emphasize the realities of finite resources, thereby allying itself with the more conservative voices? As an illustration of a productive framework, the paper discusses how global education with an international human rights content might raise an opportunity for these questions to be given a fair hearing. The paper concludes by urging stronger leadership from colleges and universities for social studies education with a world view. (RM)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Social Science Education Consortium (East Lansing, MI, June 2-5, 1982).