NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED216666
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-May
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Ethnic Minority Graduates of 1973 Through 1979: Their Postgraduate Studies, Occupations, and Impressions of UC Davis.
Whitmore, Robin L.; Amos, Arthur K., Jr.
In May 1980, the 1973-1979 minority graduates of the University California at Davis were surveyed about their employment, graduate and professional school training, career progress, and university experiences. The response rate was 33.7 percent. Minority groups included were American Indian, black, Chicano, Latino, and Filipino. Most had taken graduate level coursework, and felt well-prepared by undergraduate work. American Indians were most likely to have undertaken graduate work, be currently enrolled, and be full-time students. Eighty-three percent of the respondents were currently employed, most full-time, and in a broad range of occupations. Fifty-three percent felt their occupations were highly or moderately related to college major, with Filipinos most likely to feel them highly related. Median annual salary of full-time workers was $16,500. Job satisfaction was generally high. Respondents also reported on their feelings of personal, intellectual, and social growth as a result of their college experiences. In each area, respondents reported that the university contributed very much or somewhat to their growth. Over three-quarters would definitely or probably choose to attend the university again if they could start college over. Filipinos were least likely to choose the same university again. Attitudes toward choosing the university again were related to feelings about preparation for current occupations. Comparisons with a similar survey of all graduates from 1973 to 1979 show great similarities between the groups. Results of both surveys are illustrated in tables and graphs. The survey instrument is appended. (MSE)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: California Univ., Davis. Office of Student Affairs Research and Information.
Identifiers: University of California Davis