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ERIC Number: ED216594
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Seniors in Action: A Case Study of Participation at the University of Toronto by the Senior Alumni Association.
Gleberzon, William
Objectives, administrative organization, and activities of the Senior Alumni Association of the University of Toronto, which consists of members at least 60 years old, are described. The programs of the association are self-sustaining and generated from fees charged for its continuing education courses. Surplus funds generated by these fees are contributed to the University of Toronto, probably to its new program in gerontology. The association does not actively engage as an organization in fund-raising for the university; its focus is its programs and activities. Three categories of activity are advisory, service, and education. Senior alumni are represented on the advisory committee of the program in gerontology and have been asked to serve as resource persons and evaluators in its new diploma course. They also help in designing a new alumni college program. Service functions are called "Alumni Talent Unlimited" and projects include: teaching English as a second language, monitoring careers talks, providing guides for campus tours, and providing guides for the university's library. The continuing education program of the association involves a lecture-discussion series to introduce senior alumni to current university faculty, a preparation for retirement course, and fun-and-fitness program. Each course is designed and implemented by individual committees of senior alumni working in conjunction with the assistant director of the Department of Alumni Affairs. As of 1981, over 500 people had participated in at least one of the association's activities. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Toronto Univ. (Ontario). Dept. of Alumni Affairs.
Identifiers: University of Toronto (Canada)