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ERIC Number: ED216437
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Government Finance of Private Education: A Review of the Australian Experience.
Sherman, Joel D.
Because Australia and the United States have similar backgrounds, constitutions, and concerns about equal educational opportunity, says the author, an examination of Australia's extensive, longtime federal aid to private elementary and secondary schools may provide useful evidence in Americans' debate over public funding for private education. The author first describes Australia's private or nongovernment school sector, which accounts for 21 percent of total enrollment and is preponderantly Roman Catholic. He recounts the development of government support for nongovernment schools, especially since the 1950s, reviews the types and amounts of government aid, and compares government aid and schools' expenditures per pupil for public and private education. Next the paper discusses a 1981 Australian High Court decision on government funding and the constitutional separation of church and state, noting differences and similarities between the Australian and U.S. constitutions. Also noted is the recent increase in private schools' share of Australian enrollment and government educational aid, after a decline in the 1960s and 1970s. The author concludes by relating the Australian experience to U.S. questions about government funding's effects on enrollment, public school finances, character of the student body, private school regulation, equity, and mobility. (RW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Australia
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, March 19-23, 1982).