NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED216375
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Audience in Introductory Composition: Reducing the Pretending.
Brent, Douglas
The latest perceptions of writer-audience relationships have not been applied to what teachers actually do in the classroom. When the idea of audience is applied at all, it is often misapplied, resulting in classroom activities that fail to facilitate learning and many, in some cases, that force students to perform tasks so unreal that credibility is destroyed. If it is true that the basics of generating and organizing material can be learned from any kind of writing as long as enough is performed and enough of the right kind of feedback is given (the assumption that justifies the use of belletristic models and expressive writing assignments), then the important thing is to provide students with as much feedback as possible on any kind of writing. The ideal would be a writing course paired closely with a content course and team taught by a composition and a content area instructor. If this is unwieldy administratively, then instructors should provide writing assignments that are related to the types of writing the students will likely encounter in other disciplines. The specific differences between assignments in various disciplines are mostly a matter of external format and should be learned in the relevant content courses. Composition instructors should teach general writing strategies, including a sensitivity to audience. For this task, a collection of student writing samples from both humanistic and scientific disciplines, preferably with comments from the instructor who assigned them, should be sufficient to help students understand the rhetorical situation that is important to them--acquiring and demonstrating mastery of a subject by writing about it. (HOD)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Audience Awareness; Writing across the Curriculum
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (33rd, San Francisco, CA, March 18-20, 1982).