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ERIC Number: ED215974
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Feb
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Burnout: A Study of Professional and Personal Variables.
Borthwick, Paul; And Others
This study examined relationships between level of teacher burnout and professional variables (grade level taught, class size, years of teaching experience, highest degree earned) and personal variables (sex, age, income, health status, marital status). Level of burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which produces data on three categories of burnout--emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Responses from 1,091 elementary and secondary school teachers to the MBI were analyzed. Significant differences in levels of measured burnout among teachers were evident for two professional variables--grade level and years of teaching experiences. Subsequent t-tests on these factors provided the conclusions that secondary school teachers exhibited a higher level of measured burnout, and teachers with fewer years of experience exhibited a higher level of burnout. It is suggested that working with adolescents in a high school environment may be more stressful than working with younger students, or that the environment of the elementary school is more supportive of teachers. The finding that teachers with fewer years of experience exhibited higher burnout raises concerns as to the maturity level, including coping ability, of younger teachers to handle the daily stress demands of school. A reduction in measured burnout exhibited by teachers as they gained experience suggests that certain coping skills are acquired in the field. Neither the class size variable nor highest degree earned variable produced any significant differences among groups. Personal variables identified as significant included sex, age, and race. Females exhibited higher measured burnout than males, white teachers exhibited higher burnout than minority group teachers, and younger teachers exhibited higher burnout than older teachers. (JD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (Houston, TX, February, 1982).