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ERIC Number: ED215747
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Apr-6
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Crossing Frontiers: Multi-College Organizational Development on a Shoestring.
Parsons, Michael H.
The pressures engendered by the scarce resources of the 1980s demand the development of new organizational designs that respond to local cultural, economic, and social needs. In the Cumberland and Shenandoah Valleys, a four-state region containing 12 postsecondary institutions, a voluntary association of colleges was formed to solve mutual and recurring problems and derive the maximum benefit from scarce funding. Initial meetings among college representatives confirmed the benefits of institutional communication and cooperation and confronted a number of important issues, including the articulation of student transfer among institutions, mutual concerns related to academic advising and educational quality, declining resources for staff development, and the special needs of older, part-time students. From these discussions solutions emerged and were implemented. For example, articulation agreements were developed to remove barriers to student transfer; a seminar on academic advising at Frostburg State College was opened to other association members; members shared information on honors programs as a response to the question of general education quality; an informal agreement was made to include personnel from member colleges in staff development activities; and the viability of residential baccalaureate programs was investigated. Plans for further joint activity exist in the areas of program review and community needs assessment. (HB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Cumberland Valley; Shenandoah Valley
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (62nd, St. Louis, MO, April 4-7, 1982).