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ERIC Number: ED214721
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 78
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Migratory Status and School Achievement: Analysis of Critical Mediating Variables.
Ockerman-Garza, Janet; And Others
The relationship among key social/psychological variables (self-esteem, locus of control, social isolation, perceptions of role models) and achievement among migrant children was examined, using December 1980 data obtained from 1,004 seventh grade students (515 males/489 females) from a large school district in Hidalgo County in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley. The students were predominantly Mexican American; 445 were classified as migrants and 82% were classified as lower socioeconomic class. A questionnaire was developed that included three standardized instruments which were revised: Rosenberg Self-Esteem Index, Nowicki-Strickland Reaction Survey, and Dean's Alienation Scale. Students' perceptions of role models and related occupational structure were obtained from a series of open-ended questions. Achievement data were obtained from a review of students' Stanford Achievement Test subscores in social science, science, English, and math. Data indicated that non-migrants were in the "high" self-esteem category while migrants were in the "medium" category; migrants had a more external orientation than non-migrants; migrant students experienced more school social isolation than non-migrant students, and males were more isolated than females; and all students had a constricted view of the occupational structure and perceived good jobs in sex-stereotyped ways. (NQA)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Dean Alienation Scale; Nonmigrants; Nowicki Strickland Personal Reaction Survey; Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale
Note: Paper copy not available due to author preference. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, March 1982).