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ERIC Number: ED212979
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Oct
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Teaching the Language Arts Through SAQ: Students Asking Questions.
Smith, Nancy J.
Students Asking Questions (SAQ) has proved to be a simple, effective method for teaching urban third grade students to generate literal, inferential, and critical questions from their readings of instructional materials. Teachers using the SAQ method prepare students for reading a selection from a basal reader by offering one literal, one inferential, and one critical question about the material as models. The teacher asks these sample questions and solicits similar questions from the students during regular reading lessons and encourages the students to create and record their own questions about texts during and after silent reading. When the effect of SAQ on student question generation was investigated in 12 third-grade classrooms, the results showed that students of low, average, and high reading abilities in the SAQ groups generated significantly more literal, inferential, and critical questions than comparable students in control groups. The advantages of SAQ include its adaptability to any written materials, its effectiveness with groups of varying sizes, increased student participation in class discussions, and the integration of reading, writing, and listening skills. Thus SAQ can renew enthusiasm for the instructional process while it involves readers in the process of thinking and communicating. (RL)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Reading Strategies
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Plains Regional Conference of the International Reading Association (9th, Des Moines, IA, October 22-24, 1981).