NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED212612
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Feb
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Satisfaction of Hygiene and Motivation Needs of Teachers Who Resigned from Teaching.
Frataccia, Enrico V.; Hennington, Iris
The growing incidence of teacher burnout suggests that many teachers have difficulty in satisfying their needs and in deriving satisfaction from teaching. This study examined the needs that teachers appear to have difficulty in satisfying. The study is based on Herzberg's Hygiene-Motivation Theory. This theory, related to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, notes that all humans have two sets of needs: the need for psychological growth, and the need to avoid unpleasantness. The factors associated with the motivation component of this theory are related to self actualization: achievement, recognition, work, advancement, and responsibility. The factors associated with the hygiene component involve security and social needs: company policy and administration, supervision, salary, interpersonal relations, and working conditions. Thirty-seven teachers who had resigned from teaching responded to two ten-item questionnaires. Two hypotheses were tested: (1) Teachers who resigned from teaching will report no job satisfaction relative to the motivation component of the Hygiene-Motivation Theory; and (2) Teachers who resigned from teaching will report job dissatisfaction relative to the hygiene component. Each hypothesis was found to be valid. Within the hygiene component, the teachers were dissatisfied with all the factors. Within the motivation component, teachers reported dissatisfaction with recognition, advancement, and achievement. The role of the school principal in accepting responsibility for meeting these needs is particularly important. (JD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Hygiene Motivation Theory (Herzberg)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southwest Educational Research Association (Austin, TX, February 11-13, 1982).