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ERIC Number: ED212530
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970
Pages: 140
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The African Past and the Coming of the European. Through African Eyes: Cultures in Change, Unit III.
Clark, Leon E., Ed.
Third in a series of six dealing with African culture and intended for secondary level students, this book deals with the ancient kingdoms of the Western Sudan, the early civilizations of East Africa, the coming of the Europeans, and the Atlantic slave trade. Almost all of the selections in the volume were written by Africans, and they come from a variety of sources including speeches, autobiographies, newspaper articles, historical documents, and archaeological evidence. This book is not meant to offer a complete history of Africa, its intention is to simply present a glimpse of a very long heritage. The basic purpose of the book is to capture some of the feelings, aspirations, and experiences of black Africans, and, by so doing, help the reader develop a sense of empathy and a feeling of identity with human beings everywhere, recognizing the common humanity that all men share. Discussion questions are provided for the selections. The selections in the first half of the book deal with the African past up to the coming of the European, around the year 1450. The three ancient kingdoms of the Western Sudan--Ghana, Mali, and Songhay--are the themes of the readings. Some selections also explore the value of the oral tradition and of archaeology in reconstructing a people's history. The second half of the book deals with the Africans' experience with Europeans, particularly in the slave trade, up to the beginning of the colonial period, in the second half of the nineteenth century. (Author/RM)
CITE Books, 777 United Nations Plaza, Suite 9-H, New York, NY 10017 ($5.95).
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Learner
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Council on International and Public Affairs, New York, NY.; Center for International Training and Education, New York, NY.
Identifiers: Africa
Note: Some photographs, illustrations, and maps throughout the document may not reproduce well from EDRS in microfiche or paper copy. For related documents, see SO 013 828-833.