NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED212404
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Education, Development and the Search for Human Liberation. Development Education Paper No. 11.
Burns, Robin
The text of a speech at a UNICEF conference in Australia, this document discusses how development education has come into being, why it is important, and prospects and problems for furthering the work. Amidst criticism of the sincerity of donor charity, the honesty and effectiveness of helping agencies, media overexposure, and the questioning of "us" going to solve "their problems," the work of Brazilian Paulo Freire in the 1970's articulated an approach to development education called conscientisation. Seen in this way, development education is concerned with fundamental human situations and with an approach to people which does not present predetermined solutions but starts an action-reflection spiral which enables them to implement their own solutions. Because education can change outlooks, habits, and modes of thinking and feeling, development education must be an active process where teacher-learner distinctions become blurred in the joint process of discovery of self and others. The first step for interested agency members, teachers, and concerned individuals is to clarify what their situation is, their awareness of development, its meaning and action implications, and to be convinced that education is a fundamental need in Australia to further the work of development, liberation, and justice. (NEC)
UNICEF, 866 UN Plaza, New York, NY 10706.
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.
Identifiers: Australia; Conscientisation; Consciousness Raising; Development Education; UNICEF
Note: For related documents, see RC 013 135-144. Paper presented at a UNICEF Conference on the International Year of the Child (Australia, 1978).