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ERIC Number: ED212182
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 271
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-0-930-888-11-I
ISSN: N/A
Brooklyn College. The First Half-Century.
Horowitz, Murray M.
The history of the first public co-educational liberal arts college in New York City, from 1930 to the present is examined as a reflection of American higher education during this period. Part 1, "The Early Years," discusses how free education came to Brooklyn, life in the Borough Hall district, the academic scene, student movements, and the change from Borough Hall to Flatbush. Part 2, "The Gideonse Era, 1939-1966," examines the college under the direction of Harry Gideonse, the changing ideas in academe, the student body, Communism and the staff, World War II and its aftermath, and the growth of the university with emphasis on the city university. "The Interegnum, 1966-1969" in the third part includes discussion of the storm that swept the campus with the Vietnam War, the peace movement, and minority access. Part 4, "The Kneller Decade, 1969-1979," focuses on: the direction of John W. Keller; the changes in the concept of the college in the areas of: open admissions, new structure, new programs, and unrest; the everyday life of student and faculty on campus; and evaluation. Finally, "The Old Order" in part 5 offers a reflective summary on the university in the past and the possibilities for the future. The present president of Brooklyn, Robert L. Hess, asserts that in the future there will be more involvement with the community renewed faculty and student morale, and a clear focus on the mission of Brooklyn College in these changing times. (LC)
Brooklyn College Press, New York, NY ($19.50).
Publication Type: Books; Historical Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: City University of New York Brooklyn College; Institutional History
Note: Brooklyn College Studies on Society in Change No. 22.