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ERIC Number: ED211824
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Dec
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Using Self-Awareness Techniques (COPS) in Conjunction with a Career Information System (MetroGuide) to Facilitate the Career Planning Process.
Staton, John L.
A program in career planning was designed for disadvantaged New York City high school students who had experienced problems in attendance, punctuality, and relationships with others. Its goal was to increase student's self awareness of interests, aptitudes, abilities, and values in relationship to the world of work. Twenty-four Black and Hispanic students in two Consumer and Career Education courses at the A. Philip Randolph Comprehensive High School participated. Most of this paper is devoted to description of the program's theoretical basis and lessons used in the program. The process of Theme Centered Interactional (TCI) Groups is defined; leader's role is discussed; the system's axioms, postulates, and auxiliary ground rules of communication are presented; and purpose of having a theme is addressed. A discussion follows of use of the Career Occupational Preference System, career awareness program consisting of measures of interest (COPS), abilities (CAPS), and values (COPES). Four lessons are detailed that follow the theme, "Getting Information to Select a Career." These topics are covered: career interests, abilities, values, and use of COPS system results to get career information from MetroGuide. The place of these techniques in the career planning process is discussed. (YLB)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New York City Board of Education, Bronx, NY. Center for Career and Occupational Services.
Identifiers: Career Information Systems; Career Occupational Preference System; New York (New York); Self Awareness; Theme Centered Interactional Method
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Vocational Association (75th, Atlanta, GA, December 8, 1981).