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ERIC Number: ED211421
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Sep
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The State and the Political Mobilization of Women: Bargaining for the Feminist Agenda, 1900-1975.
Klein, Ethel
This analysis examines when and how the state facilitated or repressed the emergence and success of the Women's Liberation Movement for the period between 1900 to 1975. The Feminist Movement has placed women's issues on the agenda, but that does not mean that they have been successful. Examples of the kinds of efforts the state is currently willing to extend include the following: the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which was to insure equal employment opportunity, and President Kennedy's Executive Order in 1961 in which he charged a committee with implementing equal employment opportunities in government employment and in the employment of government contracts. The intended impact of these actions, however, is very limited due to either the scope of coverage or lack of enforcement/sanctioning power. In the short term, an analysis of current gains suggests that legislative efforts have been marginal in addressing women's labor market problems. The long term implications of the legislative procedures are harder to evaluate. The vagueness and symbolic nature of state regulatory policies do not necessarily mean that they can never be converted into means of generating tangible resources. If this process can come about, it requires long-term, sustained effort on the part of the challenging group. The women's movement had and has at its disposal many resources crucial to this conversion process including organization, money, numbers, public support, expertise, and sympathizers in the bureaucracy. (Author/RM)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (New York, NY, September, 3-6, 1981).