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ERIC Number: ED211317
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Children's Economic Activities and Primary School Attendance in Rural Guatemala.
Clark, Carol A. M.
To investigate whether low school attendance rates in Guatemala (about 35% of primary school aged children do not attend) are due primarily to the need for children in low income families to contribute to family income or child care and other housekeeping tasks, time use data were collected in 4 rural villages from mothers of 369 children, aged 7-14. Participant families had an average 1975 per capita income of $91 and lived in 1- or 2-room houses with mud floors in villages of 500-1,000 inhabitants, located between 2 and 4 hours by bus from Guatemala City; roughly 35% of household heads were able to read and write. Male school non-attenders worked more than school attenders, but one half of the 11-14 year old and one quarter of the 7-10 year old male school attenders worked between 1 and 6 hours; 13% of the non-attender 11-14 year old males reported doing no work and another 9% doing less than 3 hours; and about 22% of the non-attender girls did neither child care nor meal preparation, and little or no income-earning or housekeeping work. However, analyses did not clarify cause and effect: whether a child is not in school because he has to work or whether he is working because he is not in school. Suggested policy interventions would reduce work constraints and increase motivation to send children to school. (NEC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Rockefeller Foundation, New York, NY.; Agency for International Development (Dept. of State), Washington, DC.; Ford Foundation, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: Rand Corp., Santa Monica, CA.
Identifiers: Guatemala; Time Utilization
Note: Paper copy not available due to publisher's choice. Paper presented at the Symposium on "Multidisciplinary Applications of Time Budget Methodology for Developmental Research: An International Perspective" at the Annual Meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development (Boston, MA, April 2-5, 1981).