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ERIC Number: ED210834
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Relative Effect of Various Word Synthesis on the Phonics Achievement of Learning Disabled Youngsters. Technical Report # 5.
Fayne, Harriet R.; Bryant, N. Dale
The study involving 105 neurologically impaired or learning disabled elementary school children examined the relative effectiveness of various word attack strategies for a reading disabled population. Children were taught with lessons over a 2 day period which provided direct instruction on a medial vowel sound, practice on monosyllabic words containing the sound, and specific transfer training on nonsense syllables. Word attack strategy was varied for the five treatment groups: (1) initial bigram training in which words were broken down into two components--the initial bigram and the final consonant; (2) final bigram training in which words were broken down into two components--the initial consonant and the final bigram; (3) letter by letter training in which words were broken down into individual phonemes; (4) initial-final bigram training in which words were broken down into individual bigram and final consonant on Day 1 and by the initial consonant and final bigram on Day 2; and (5) final-initial bigram training in which words were broken down first by the initial consonant and final bigram on Day 1, and then by the initial bigram and final consonant on Day 2. The initial bigram strategy yielded significantly better performance on transfer words. The strategy appeared to be differentially effective because it emphasized both left to right processing and reduced the number of units to be synthesized. This finding called into question approaches which emphasize rhyming patterns or letter by letter decoding. (Author/SB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Special Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Research Inst. for the Study of Learning Disabilities.
Identifiers: N/A