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ERIC Number: ED210704
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teaching of Writing: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1981 (Vol. 42 Nos. 1 through 6).
ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 21 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) a text designed for basic writing students; (2) the role of the planning board in college freshman writing; (3) teaching the composing process to college level basic writers; (4) a modified Delphi application of writing skills in community college vocational/technical programs; (5) the effect of decision making instruction on the simple expository writing of sixth grade students; (6) theory and practice of writing across the curriculum; (7) a curriculum to stimulate psychological development and writing maturity in college freshmen; (8) a model for evaluating student writing; (9) the quality of fourth grade children's creative writing resulting from three motivation approaches; (10) participating teachers' perceptions of and attitudes toward a National Writing Project workshop; (11) the cognitive dimension of writer's block; (12) syntactic and rhetorical organization and the teaching of freshman composition; (13) an examination of a stage/process tutorial model for teaching English composition; and (14) the effectiveness of a freshman composition values curriculum for developing competency in the presentation of alternative ideas in writing. (HTH)
Publication Type: Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
Identifiers: Freshman Composition; National Writing Project
Note: Pages may be marginally legible.