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ERIC Number: ED210678
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Mar
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Exploring Apprehension: Composing Processes of Apprehensive and Non-Apprehensive Intermediate Freshmen Writers.
Hayes, Christopher G.
The composing processes of apprehensive and nonapprehensive college freshmen writers were explored in a case study of two female students. The two students, one a high apprehensive and the other a low apprehensive writer, completed a questionnaire that elicited information about their attitudes toward writing, writing concerns, time spent writing, and other composing habits. The students then wrote two essays (one personal and one expository), on separate days, while being videotaped. After each writing session, the student watched the videotape of her performance and commented on all she could remember about her thoughts, sources for ideas and examples, pauses, word changes, rereadings, revisions, and other pertinent acts. The essays were then analyzed for all the information they conveyed about the composing process of the writers. The results showed many differences between the two students. The apprehensive writer disliked writing and took a great deal of time to complete an assignment, while the nonapprehensive writer enjoyed writing and wrote rapidly. The apprehensive writer paused often during writing and usually wrote only one draft. In contrast, the nonapprehensive writer usually finished a first draft with few pauses, made a few minor changes, and immediately started on a second draft. Only occassionally did she reread the first draft after she began the second or subsequent drafts. (Writing samples are appended.) (FL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Writing Apprehension
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (32nd, Dallas, TX, March 26-28, 1981). Appendix of writing samples may be marginally legible.