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ERIC Number: ED210220
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Aug
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Doing Sociology with Video Tape.
Aldrich, Brian C.
This paper describes the production of a videotape which shows how visual sociology can be used to explicate the varying images which are associated with different status groups and which create conflict about the environment. The videotape, Alternative Images of the Mississippi, Images I, shows in a systematic sociological fashion, the range of images of the physical environment which are held by environmentalists active in the Hiawatha Valley portion of the Upper Mississippi River Basin below the Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area. It was the intention of the project to show those images in such a way that they would be recognized as important scientific statements in the debates, contests, and litigation over the environmental quality in the Hiawatha Valley. The paper describes the interviewing, editing, and production processes used. Previous research on environmental issues was utilized to prepare for the interviewing. Also presented in the paper is a rationale for the use of visual sociology in the form of videotaping. The rational draws upon Habermas' categories of scientific interest. Of the three described, the "empirical-analytic," the "hermeneutical," and the "critical," it is the second of these, the "hermeneutical" which lends itself to visual sociology in general and videotaping in particular. Hermeneutical science studies the values, assumptions, and images of groups and provides a systematic analysis of where various groups are coming from. (Author/RM)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Habermas (Jurgen); Hermeneutics
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (Boston, MA, August, 1979).