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ERIC Number: ED210067
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Nov
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Staff Development through Degrees: Alternative to the Ph. D.
Hansen, Desna W.; Rhodes, Dent M.
Most serious staff development programs share the characteristics of strong administrative support, needs-based planning, widespread faculty participation, and a well-defined program of activities. Unfortunately, these activities are often ad hoc affairs, influenced by what is fashionable and financially feasible. Formal degree programs can provide an alternative to ad hoc faculty development. Several degree options are available, including the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.), the Doctor of Education (Ed. D.) in College Teaching, the Doctor of Arts (D. A.), and the Ed. D. in Postsecondary Curriculum and Instruction. Though each of these program options has several advantages, faculty members should also be aware of several problematic considerations related to the pursuit of a degree: (1) the availability of degree programs; (2) whether they will teach full- or part-time; (3) monetary considerations; (4) their relationships with their instructors; and (5) the lack of the sense of community of many graduate programs. Once the faculty member has come to terms with these problems, he/she must decide on the appropriate degree. Several factors should influence this choice, including his/her career goals, perception of personal and professional roles, and feelings toward study and research. Whatever the instructor's ultimate choice, staff development directors and personnel can contribute in several important ways to the careers and professional development of faculty members. (AYC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the National Conference of the National Council of Staff, Program, and Organizational Development (Philadelphia, PA, November 1-4, 1981).