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ERIC Number: ED209477
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 443
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Factors Relating to the Job Placement of Former Secondary Vocational Education Students.
McKinney, Floyd A.; And Others
A study identified factors influencing placement of former secondary vocational education students in jobs related to their training. Findings also described educational and community processes appearing to influence job placement. Data came from a literature review, analysis of existing data, case studies, and mail questionnaires. Case studies were conducted in eight local education agencies (LEAs) in seven states. Existing data for all 50 states and 586 LEAs were analyzed. Mail questionnaires were received from 5,062 individuals representing 10 respondent groups in 62 LEAs in the seven states. Data indicated higher job placement in schools where administrators, counselors, and teachers believe job placement is a purpose of vocational education programs and is their responsibility; admission to vocational education programs is restricted to students with high interest and potential; there is a high demand for workers in the surrounding labor market area; manufacturing is a major community industry; the community has a mix of industry sizes; needs assessment surveys are frequently used to plan and evaluate vocational education programs; teachers have regular contact with employers regarding job placement; students participate in youth organizations and acquire job readiness training and basic education skills; and the vocational education curriculum is oriented to employers' needs. (Appendixes include instruments, data tables, and bibliography). (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.
Identifiers: N/A
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