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ERIC Number: ED208041
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Dec
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Multilevel Analyses of Teacher-Student Relationships in Junior High Classrooms.
Martin, Jeanne; Evertson, Carolyn M.
Classroom behaviors from the Texas Junior High School Study were related to achievement using both class means and student scores within classes as the units of analysis. Behaviors significantly related to achievement at the class level of analysis were not related to achievement within the class and vice versa. There was no clear pattern of significant relationships at the class level of analysis. However, significant within-class relationships did form a pattern indicating that students who were not as successful academically as other students in the class with similar entering ability, tended to act differently in the classroom and were treated differently by the teacher. Several explanations were offered for this pattern of teacher-student interactions occurring within classes. It was concluded that results obtained at one level of analysis cannot be generalized to other levels. Therefore, it is important that multilevel classroom data be analyzed at both the class and student within class levels to develop a more thorough understanding of the relation of classroom processes to student achievement. (Author)
Communication Services, Research and Development Center for Teacher Education, Education Annex 3.203, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712.
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Texas Univ., Austin. Research and Development Center for Teacher Education.
Identifiers: California Achievement Tests; Texas Junior High School Study
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (65th, Los Angeles, CA, April 13-17, 1981).