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ERIC Number: ED207748
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Mar-23
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Study of Aspirations, Attitudes and Motivational Structure of Adolescent Girl Students of Iraq for Out-of-Home Jobs.
Shukla, Aditya N.; El-Hanafy, Mohammad Ghanim
To ascertain the educational, occupational and social aspirations, attitudes and motivation-structure of Iraqi adolescent girl students, a questionnaire was distributed to 137 randomly-selected students from 2 colleges at the University of Mosul. Respondents were predominantly urban-oriented, dormitory residents, unmarried, average in scholastic performance, and from families of medium/high education and of middle income; 37.23% aspired to doctoral levels, 21.17% to master's degrees, and 41.60% to baccalaureates. After completing baccalaureate studies, almost 51% wanted out-of-home jobs to serve country, 31.31% aspired to post-graduate studies, and 21% wanted to marry; 81% of the total sample desired permanent out-of-home work, whereas 3-5% aspired to work either temporarily, until marriage, or if family income status required; teaching (43.06%) and research (40.87%) were the most favored professions, with 8.76% desiring extension-oriented work. For social aspirations, 88.31% wanted to choose their own husband, whose most desirable traits would be good character, high education, good personality, and awareness of women's rights and equality; 53.28% wanted two children or fewer. Leading motivations for out-of-home job aspirations were to serve the country, have higher social recognition/status, and acquire new experiences. The major implication was that intensive efforts should encourage girls of rural areas/low economic status to enhance their aspirations. (AW/MH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Iraq
Note: Paper presented at the "Youth Sociology" Research Committee Meeting of the International Sociological Association (Fredeburg, Federal Republic of Germany, March 23-27, l98l). Some pages may not reproduce clearly due to poor print quality.