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ERIC Number: ED207738
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Jun
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Mexican American Culture Simulator for Child Welfare. Technical Report.
Montalvo, Frank F.; And Others
Project staff and experienced child welfare personnel adapted the Culture Simulator to train child welfare caseworkers to have an empathic understanding of minority children and families in order to encourage and support ethnic identity, integrity, and community life. The training technique used 4 self-instructional modules containing 40 critical casework incidents (derived from discussions with 180 San Antonio, Texas, barrio residents) depicting misunderstanding between Mexican American clients and Anglo American child welfare workers due to differences in their sociocultural backgrounds. Trainees (27 non-Hispanic child welfare workers) were instructed to rank the 4 alternative explanations for the misunderstanding in each vignette according to the-best-to-the-least preferred answer. Trainees were given the teaching volumes, each with a test form and rationales, in sequence. After reading the rationales in order of their answer selection, trainees scored their own tests. Results from trainees and 3 control groups (46 child welfare and family service workers tested with single volumes) indicated that significant cumulative learning took place, the technique was equally effective with experienced and inexperienced workers and for those with extensive exposure to the Mexican American community, and the best results were obtained when the modules were followed by discussions designed to integrate the knowledge gained. (Author/CM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Our Lady of the Lake Univ., San Antonio, TX.
Identifiers: Mexican American Culture Simulator; Texas (San Antonio)
Note: Funded for 1979-1980 by the Children's Bureau, Dept. of Health and Human Services, as having national significance for improving services to the Hispanic community.