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ERIC Number: ED207630
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Jun
Pages: 141
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Humanistic Literacy and the Community College Student.
Grant, Grace E., Ed.
This collection of papers addresses the complex problem of humanistic literacy, stressing techniques for creating a relationship between our inherited knowledge and the abilities to read intelligently and write clearly. After an introduction on the issue of humanistic literacy and the preparation of this publication, the three papers in Section I suggest ways in which remediation and humanistic education can be combined. The first essay, "Homer's 'Odyssey' and Humanistic Education: Towards a Theory of the Humanities," by Clay A. Boland, Jr., discusses the "Odyssey" as a source of descriptive definitions of humanism, humanist, and humanistic education. "The American Musical: A Value-Reflecting Ritual," by Wayne H. Freeman, explores the social values and cultural changes reflected in this art form. In "Community Colleges and Literacy," Donald B. Epstein traces the history of literacy training and reviews the Guided Studies Program at Clackamas Community College (OR) which links the humanities with the life experiences of nontraditional students. The papers in Section II describe remedial programs with a humanistic emphasis. Margaret Byrd Boegeman, in "Autobiography in English Composition," describes the use of autobiographical writing in developing language skills and promoting self-awareness and self-confidence. "Learning to Write Sentence by Sentence: A Modular Approach to English Composition," by Peter L. Sharkey, examines the College of Marin's (CA) course, which emphasizes thesis, tone, and point of view. (KL)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.; Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: Claremont Graduate School, CA.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Prepared by the Humanities Faculty Development Program.