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ERIC Number: ED207515
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 40
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Role of Stimulus-Size on Performance in the Embedded-Figures-Test and in the Rod-and-Frame-Test and the Implications of This Role for the Perceptual and Cognitive Style Constructs in Educational Technology Research.
Streibel, Michael J.
Three experiments were performed in which subjects were exposed to two sizes of the Embedded Figures Test (EFT), and subjects in the third experiment were also exposed to two sizes of the Rod and Frame Test (RFT). In the first experiment, where the EFT had a size differential of 1 to 4, a nonsignificant size effect and a significant rank correlation was found for the performances on the two sizes. In experiments 2 and 3, where the EFT size differential was 1 to 8, a nonsignificant and a significant size effect was found for all subjects, respectively. In both experiments, however, a significant interaction was found between the field dependency and stimulus size factors. Field dependent subjects, in effect, became significantly more field independent, and field independent subjects became significantly more field dependent. Finally, in experiment 3, the performances of all subjects on the two sizes of the EFT and the two sizes of the standard RFT were compared. A significant stimulus size effect was found in the EFT with all subjects becoming more field independent, and a significant stimulus size effect was found in the RFT with all subjects becoming more field dependent. Ten tables and two figures display the data, and 20 references are listed. (Author/LLS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Embedded Figures Test; Field Dependence Independence; Rod and Frame Test
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (Philadelphia, PA, April 6-10, 1981). Not available separately: see IR 009 554. Research supported in part by the University of Wisconsin, Psychology Department.