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ERIC Number: ED207385
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Mar
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Beyond Productivity to Quality.
Hodgkinson, Harold L.
The current, popular time-and-motion approach to faculty productivity suggests an antiquated strategy not currently in use in business and industry. Higher education needs to develop an idea of productivity that focuses on quality of product, not quantity. The institution must have a commitment to the physical, emotional, and intellectual well-being of each worker, its investment in human resources; in this arena, higher education and business already have much in common. Several key questions higher education needs to ask of itself include: Does it serve national needs by getting into higher education the people who can benefit most from it, and encourage completion of programs and continuing education to receive good return on the investment? Can we use resources effectively without overtaxing them? What incentives are offered at all levels for improvement of performance, diversity, cooperation? Have students become autonomous learners? Are faculty and administrators working together in areas that will clearly benefit the institution? Have graduates increased their ability to contribute to and benefit from society? Are faculty organized in a way that allows them to do the things at which they excel? Is the quality of campus life such that students and faculty will stay? The value-added approach must be taken to higher education programs, and by extension of this philosophy, no one should be taught what he already knows. Standards must change in higher education before other sectors, like the legislatures, decide to perform that task for academe. (MSE)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Higher Education (Washington, DC, March 1981).