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ERIC Number: ED206538
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Ranking Studies of Graduate Sociology Departments in "The American Sociologist": 1965-1980.
Jensen, Eric L.; Webster, David
This paper reviews ranking studies of graduate level college and university departments of sociology in "The American Sociologist" from its inception in 1965 through 1980. "The American Sociologist" was selected as the source of ranking studies because of its function "as an organ of information and discussion for the professional concerns of sociologists as a social collectivity," and, specifically, because it has presented a large number of articles on prestige within the discipline. Studies reviewed in the paper are limited to those which deal with the prestige or quality rankings of departments, the changing methods of ranking studies in sociology, divergent results of the various methodologies used in the ratings, and mobility of departments over time. Most of the studies date from 1965 through 1975 because editorial policy during this period favored rating studies whereas editorial policy after this time discouraged them. Ranking studies discussed include four which rate the faculty of graduate sociology department b total productivity (Knudsen-Vaughan, 1969; Glenn-Villemez, 1970; Oromaner, 1972; and Doering, 1972), and four which rate graduates by total productivity (Wanderer, 1966; Knudsen-Vaughn, 1969; Larson, Petronsky, and Vandiver, 1972; and Sturgis and Clemente, 1973). Findings from analysis of tabular and expository departmental rating data indicate that there exists a generally agreed-upon elite among graduate sociology depatments (Harvard, UC Berkeley, Columbia, Chicago, and Michigan), editors of prestigious journals tend to be concentrated in these same elite departments, and the status of the institution is often a good predictor of departmental prestige. (DB)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Ranking
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Los Angeles, CA, April 13-17, 1981).