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ERIC Number: ED206412
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Jun
Pages: 48
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Breast-Feeding in the Developing World: Current Patterns and Implications for Future Trends. Reports on the World Fertility Survey 2.
Kent, Mary Mederios
This report uses World Fertility Survey data obtained between 1974 and 1978 to investigate the initiation and duration of breast-feeding in 19 developing countries, ten of which are in Asia, eight in Latin America and the Caribbean, and one in sub-Saharan Africa (Kenya). Respondents were asked whether they had fed either their most recently born child or their next-to-last child at the breast and for how many months. A few countries added questions about the age at which infants began receiving food supplements to human milk and the number of months before the mother resumed menstruation, in an attempt to measure what effect breast-feeding had in prolonging the post-partum sterile period. The data reveal considerable diversity among the countries, although breast-feeding is widely practiced in all of them. Generally, the initation and duration of breast-feeding in these countries was found to vary inversely with higher levels of economic development, suggesting that breast-feeding will decline as these countries continue to modernize. Thus, annual birth rates could actually rise unless a concomitant increase occurs in the use of family planning methods. For much of the developing world, however, patterns of breast-feeding will remain a contributing factor in family planning for at least the immediate future. (Author/RH)
Population Reference Bureau, Circulation Department, 1337 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036 (Single copies free. Handling and postage charge, $1.00).
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Agency for International Development (Dept. of State), Washington, DC. Office of Population.
Identifiers: Asia; Breast Feeding; Caribbean; Kenya; Latin America; Modernization