NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
PDF pending restoration PDF pending restoration
ERIC Number: ED205357
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Mar
Pages: 55
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Pre-Veterinary Students in Agriculture at Southern Land-Grant Universities. Journal Series No. 1-810012 of the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station.
Dunkelberger, John E.; And Others
Because the number of students seeking admission to colleges of veterinary medicine exceeds the number that can be admitted, and because the changes that characterize veterinary students today have important implications for veterinary educators and administrators, this study focused on characteristics of undergraduate pre-veterinary students attending land grant universities in the South. The adjusted sample included 245 students with a major in pre-veterinary medicine, 79 students with pre-veterinary medicine as a second or dual major, and 749 animal science majors (for comparison purposes). The profiles described students' personal characteristics; family background; high school, agricultural, and college experiences; career influences; goals; and selected attitudes. The study documented the increased number of women seeking admittance to the veterinary profession and broad acceptance of female participation in the profession. Many pre-veterinary students lacked farm and agricultural experience. Very few of them were black or of other minority groups. A vast majority of pre-veterinary students, regardless of sex, residence, or minority status, possessed largely positive attitudes toward agriculture and the agricultural industry. They were influenced in their choice of occupation and educational curriculum by their parents and the local veterinarian. (CM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Cooperative State Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Auburn Univ., AL. Agricultural Experiment Station.
Identifiers: Pre Veterinary Students; United States (South)
Note: Research conducted as Hatch Project 440 in conjunction with the USDA Cooperative State Research Service Southern Regional Project S-114, "Defining and Achieving Life Goals: A Process of Human Resource Development."