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ERIC Number: ED204029
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Children's Feelings About Themselves. Unit for Child Studies Selected Papers Number 1.
Maron, Chris
A positive self-concept is important for all children. Parents can assess their children's feelings about themselves and improve their children's self-respect. Feelings about the self are important because they affect children's success, sense of worth, ability to love others and to learn. Adults may inadvertently undermine a child's self-esteem so that he/she does not have sufficient ego strength for taking the risks inherent in learning. Questionnaires can be used by parents to gain a more detailed understanding of a child's identity. After the level of the child's self-concept has been ascertained, many types of activity can be employed to raise the self-respect of a child who has a low self-concept. In an atmosphere of trust, teachers and parents may explore the outcomes of the following games and activities: (1) providing a personal time line on which children may record personal experiences on cards clipped to the line; (2) sharing success symbols such as photos or certificates, (3) organizing games in which children detect detracting or enhancing speech; (4) emphasizing children's strengths; (5) facilitating a positive body image; (6) aiding in the setting of attainable goals; (7) becoming aware of speech habits (for example, the over use of "should,") that diminish children's sense of self-worth; and (8) increasing children's awareness of others' perspectives through role play and role reversals. (Author/RH)
Unit for Child Studies, School of Education, University of NSW, P.O. Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033, Australia ($2.00; payment should be made in Australian dollars).
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). School of Education.
Identifiers: Australia
Note: For other papers in this series, see PS 012 278-285.