NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED203940
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr-22
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Criticizing the Role.
Cohen, Arthur M.
Critics of the community college are justified in challenging unsubstantiated statements about the institution by college spokespersons or in public relations releases disguised as institutional analyses. During the 1960's, for example, increasing enrollments were often cited as evidence of public support for community colleges--without reference to the social and demographic factors that caused the enrollment boom. Similarly, claims that community colleges do a better job of teaching than research-oriented universities are not substantiated by evidence of actual student learning. Critics should not, however, confuse institutional intentions with actual outcomes by asserting that because community colleges have not eliminated the social class structure, they are part of a conspiracy to maintain it. Indeed, the community colleges have provided higher education with a means of accommodating the increased demand for educational access that emerged in the 1960's without compromising the quality of the universities. The two-year college provided access to students who could not otherwise participate in higher education, assured a mechanism of social mobility, and helped the country avoid the problems faced by European nations who have no alternative means of dealing with students who are not admitted by universities. While the critic should expose rhetorical aberrations, s/he should do so to protect the real virtues of the community college. (JP)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Criticism
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (61st, Washington, DC, April 20-22, 1981).