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ERIC Number: ED202777
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Aug
Pages: 40
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Hispanic Political Attitudes: A Comparison of Cubans, Dominicans and Puerto Ricans.
Nelson, Dale C.
This paper examines the political attitudes of Hispanic groups, particularly the Cubans, Dominicans, and Puerto Ricans in New York City. The data for paper come from a 1973 Ethnic Block Survey of 466 residents of the Washington Heights Inwood section of Manhattan. Interviews were conducted. Three kinds of attitudes which predispose people to take political action were studied: civic attitudes, ethnic consciousness, and bureaucratic attitudes. Findings include the following. Regarding civic attitudes, the Puerto Ricans exhibited the highest levels of psychological involvement in politics. Initial findings appeared to uncover higher levels of both cynicism and community awareness among Puerto Ricans. However, when length of New York City residence was held constant, differences between Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics all but disappeared on these variables. The Puerto Ricans exhibited the highest levels of ethnic political consciousness. The Dominicans expressed higher levels of ethnic political consciousness than Cubans. The examination of bureaucratic political attitudes showed few if any differences in bureaucratic attitudes among Hispanic groups. A further comparison of Hispanics with blacks and whites did little to identify a distinctive Hispanic bureaucratic pattern. On six of the eight bureaucratic attitudes, Hispanics proved to be little differentiated from blacks and white ethnics. The more general purpose of the study was to evaluate the utility of the concept of "hispanic political behavior" as a description of a set of political attitudes. With few exceptions, the term "hispanic political attitudes" was of little conceptual help in describing the attitudes analyzed. The paper also briefly examines some political and historical features of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. (Author/RM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (Washington, DC, August 28-31, 1980). Not available from EDRS in paper copy due to poor reproducibility of original documents. Some pages may not reproduce clearly from EDRS in microfiche due to variations in ink density.