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ERIC Number: ED202416
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Retention, Professional Development and Quality of Life: A Comparative Study of Male/Female Non-Tenured Faculty.
Fuchs, Rachel G.; Lovano-Kerr, Jessie
Concerns of tenure-line, nontenured faculty regarding retention, professional development, and quality of life were studied in 1979 at Indiana University. Study objectives were to identify obstacles to tenure level performance, conditions that might influence faculty to seek positions elsewhere, demographic data, appointment data, and information about the following: degrees of satisfaction with work, perceived attitudes of colleagues toward work, amount and type of feedback and evaluation received, factors deemed important in acquiring tenure, attitudes toward the department, and factors judged important to one's quality of life. Response revealed that significantly more women were hired as lecturers than men, while significantly more men were initially hired as assistant professors; however in 1979, many women hired as lecturers had been promoted to assistant professor and there were no significant difference in the current rank of men and women. The major differences between male and female nontenured faculty occurred in their perceptions of their professional lives: women were significantly less satisfied with their quantity of work than were men, but significantly more satisfied with their service and other professional activities. Men were significantly more confident than women of receiving tenure. Both women and men felt that members of the same or opposite sex viewed them primarily as co-workers or friends. Social life and cultural environment were not as important to either men or women as the professional aspects of their lives. It is concluded that men and women faculty share the same general personal evaluation of their professional lives in their departments and at the university; there were many similarities in their viewpoints and career aspirations. (SW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Indiana University
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Los Angeles, CA, April 13-17, 1981).