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ERIC Number: ED202167
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 83
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1979. Current Population Reports: Population Characteristics Series P-20, No. 360.
Sepielli, Peter J.; Sanford, Denise I.
Thirty-six tables provide detailed information about educational and socioeconomic characteristics of students nationwide. The data show, among other things, that overall enrollment is down from 1970, especially at the kindergarten and elementary school level. College attendance is up, though, as more women and people over 25 enroll. This is especially true for two-year colleges, where enrollment growth since 1974 has resulted entirely from increased enrollment of women. The probability of college enrollment remains dependent on family income; high school graduates aged 18 to 24 from high-income families are much more likely to attend college than those from low-income families. The socioeconomic characteristics covered include age, sex, race or ethnic group, residence in metropolitan or nonmetropolitan areas, marital status, family income, and membership in the labor force. The educational characteristics considered comprise enrollment at all educational levels (from preschool through higher education), educational attainment, public or private control of the institution, full- or part-time enrollment, and two-year and four-year college attendance. Appendices extend the data back in time, as far as 1947 for some characteristics, and project college enrollment forward to 1990. (Author/RW)
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402 ($4.00).
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: For a related document, see ED 141 946. Small print may be marginally legible.