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ERIC Number: ED201555
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Clarity Begins at Home: An Analysis of Key Ideas of Invitational Education.
Novak, John M.
In order for invitational education to realize its potential as a positive, practical, and verifiable self-concept approach, it must be clearly understood by educators and educational researchers. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the general, research, practical, and theoretical concerns of invitational education. Broadly defined, invitational education is a system which intentionally invites students to perceive themselves as valuable, able, and responsible and to behave accordingly. It can be understood as a means of treating students fairly, humanely, and effectively and 'inviting' school success. The document is presented in four sections. Section one defines invitational education and focuses on two conceptual issues: (1) an analysis of invitations from the perspective of sender, receiver, and observer; and (2) justification for the practical necessity of becoming fluent in sending and receiving invitational messages. Section two offers specific suggestions for additional research on invitational education. Section three views invitational education from the point of view of the practitioner and emphasizes its potential use in solving educational problems. The final section identifies aspects of invitational education which are open to various conflicting interpretations. The concluding comment calls for additional research on the intended focus of invitational education theory in the hope that, once key theoretical issues are resolved, educational researchers can develop more substantive research methods and practical teaching strategies. (DB)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Invitational Education
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Los Angeles, CA, April 1981). For a related document, see SO 013 297.