NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED200715
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980
Pages: 70
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Functional Competencies for Adapting to the World of Work.
Selz, Nina; And Others
A study was conducted to determine who has the responsibility for teaching general occupational and consumer competencies--the home, the school, or the workplace. To answer this question, two national surveys on functional competencies in occupational adaptability and consumer economics were conducted. Competencies were first identified and then four respondent groups (national samples of the general adult population, high school seniors, public school teachers, and employers) were asked three questions about each competency: If a person did not have this ability, how well would he/she do at work? Where should a person be taught this? and Where do most people actually learn this? Results (summarized in this report) show that, in general, abilities pertaining directly to basic skills (especially mathematics skills) were perceived to be the school's responsibility for teaching. Abilities perceived to be the home's responsibility were abilities having to do with taking care of belongings. But overall, public opinion was divided among whether these abilities should be taught at home, in school, or self-taught. (The report also contains a "viewpoint" section--the authors' viewpoints on alternative interpretations and recommendations based on the results of the survey reported as well as other related research; a tentative guide for curriculum-planning dialogue; a bibliography; and the survey ability statements/task areas/enabling behaviors.) (KC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Figures will not reproduce well due to small print.