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ERIC Number: ED200437
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 342
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Use of Concept Mapping and Gowin's "V" Mapping Instructional Strategies in Junior High School Science. The Cornell University "Learning How To Learn" Project.
Novak, Joseph D.; And Others
Reported is a research project which investigated whether junior high students in the Ithaca, New York, area can acquire and use the "concept mapping" and "Gowin's 'V' mapping" strategies to facilitate meaningful learning. Concept mapping involves the identification, hierarchical organization, and graphic depiction of relationships among concepts in a body of study material. These procedures are consistent with Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning. The second learning strategy involves recognizing that all knowledge in the sciences is constructed by using records and record transforming procedures which are guided by the concepts, principles and theories that people employ. Gowin's "V" is a heuristic device that students use to graphically illustrate the interplay between the methodological and conceptual elements of each episode of knowledge-making, such as a laboratory investigation. Although many project activities centered on implementation of the two learning strategies, the positive cognitive and affective data lend support to the effectiveness of this "learning how to learn" project. Included in the appendix are the teacher's handbook and samples of student-constructed concept maps and "V" maps. (Author/WB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Shell Companies Foundation, New York, NY.; National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. Coll. of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell Univ.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Education.
Identifiers: David P Ausubel; Gowins V Mapping
Note: Contains occasional small, light and broken type. Appendices marginally legible.