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ERIC Number: ED199752
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Mar
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Writing in the Academic Community.
Brodkey, Linda
Grammar and style contribute to a matrix that expresses the writer's thinking and the values of the academic community. Writers uphold the matrix while presenting their own ideas through a system of "deixis" (to refer to or point to things or ideas not actually present or stated). Nonlinguistic deixis coordinates expression and context in ways that cannot be productively analyzed as grammatical instances. Two kinds of nonlinguistic deixis exist in "structural Poetics": (1) conventional deixis because it amounts to doing things pretty much as they usually are done, which allows the reader to make inferences about what is going on without giving much conscious attention to that fact; and (2) inventional deixis which either satisfies our expectations or disappoints us. Inventional deixis limits the possibilities, making fewer and fewer reader inferences possible, finally making the claim, when it actually comes, appear reasonable, to some readers inevitable. Deixis in published academic writing suggests that we ought to reconsider the evidence, ought to pay more attention than we have to the overwhelming importance of evidence in the academic community. The model or paradigm that takes into account the fully enculturated prose of published academics, subordinates claims to evidence. (HOD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Academic Community; Deixis; Writing for Publication
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (32nd, Dallas, TX, March 26-28, 1981).