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ERIC Number: ED198269
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Challenges of Educating Today's Youth: Entry--Retention--Graduation. Career and Vocational Guidance and Development.
Schieser, Hans A.
A large percentage of American youth enters the job market ill-prepared and lacking basic skills; the majority of our working population is not adequately prepared for the occupations in which they find themselves. Too many job changes, dissatisfaction, and a lack of systematic preparatory and continuing education have led to the productivity crisis in American industry. Taking a critical look at our career guidance and its underlying principles and comparing them to European practices points to the need for re-thinking our approach. In developing a basis for vocational choice, we need to start at the pre-school level and consistently aim at the development of skills, attitudes, and experiences for children throughout school, with emphasis on the practical. Even handicapped persons can be made employable, as the success of European schools shows. It is necessary to base a systematic career development program on psychological foundations, applying realistic concepts of work, human decision-making, and human nature. School curricula, from kindergarten through high school, should be grounded in the practical, letting students learn use of tools from early years in order to develop basic skills. Arts, crafts, and shop activities should be included for all students throughout their school years. (Author/KC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Employability Development; Europe (West)
Note: Paper presented at the Midwest Regional Annual Meeting of the Society for Ethnic and Special Studies (St. Louis, MO, April 27, 1979); and at the National Conference of the Society for Ethnic and Special Studies (Los Angeles, CA, October 7, 1979).