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ERIC Number: ED197011
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Jul-17
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
How American History Textbooks View the Caribbean.
Shapiro, Victor W.
This paper examines: (1) the extent to which recently published textbooks used in United States history survey courses reflect a revised view of the historical relationship between the Caribbean region and the United States; and (2) whether recent shifts in research emphases and methodological expansions in the field of American history have brought about significant change in traditional views of the scope, impact, and importance of the Caribbean region upon the course of United States history. Considered is the content of works published before and after 1965. Interpretive materials by leading United States historians are compared and contrasted with works by historians and social scientists who have written specialized texts on the Caribbean region and its people. Some of the topics scrutinized include: the discovery and settlement of America; mercantilism and incipient capitalism; the Seven Years War; the American Revolution; the Haitian Revolution; the U.S. Civil War; various issues related to slavery and manumission; American imperialism; the Spanish American War; the World Wars; Caribbean nationalism and regionalism; and current United States-Caribbean relations. It is posited that American historians see commonalities of historical experience between the United States and the Caribbean only when they coincide with accepted views of what is deemed to be American, and disappear when they exceed the historians' current depth of vision into the American experience. (Author/GC)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Caribbean; Caribbean History; United States
Note: Not available in paper copy due to reproduction quality of original document. Paper presented at the Association of Caribbean Studies Conference (Nassau, Bahamas, July 17, 1980).