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ERIC Number: ED196967
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-May
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Socialization and Ethnic Identity Development.
Weinreich, Peter
A study of identity development was carried out in Bristol, England, with Asian, West Indian, and indigenous British adolescents. Ethnic and gender differences in patterns of identification conflict with others were found between minority group boys and girls. Both sexes from both minority groups, however, had substantial identification conflicts with representatives of their own ethnicity, distinguishing them from indigenous adolescents. This common feature of the two minority groups may be explained in terms of dual socialization, that is, socialization within both their parental culture and British culture. Prejudice against West Indians and Asians was demonstrated in the indigenous adolescents, but the generally held view that discrimination against low status groups results in their members' self-devaluations was not supported. Similarly, the argument that sex discrimination results in self devaluation was not supported. Finally, the general argument that similar processes of identity development would be found in girls experiencing sex discrimination did not gain support. The processes of sexual identity and ethnic identity development were shown to be different. It is believed that ethnic and gender differences displayed in overall patterns of identification conflicts are related to the differential roles played by parents, teachers, and peers as positive reference models in the individual's self concept development. (Author/GC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Asians; England; West Indians
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Northern Ireland branch of the British Psychological Society (Virginia, Republic of Ireland, May 5-7, 1978).