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ERIC Number: ED196390
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 214
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
An Examination of Full-Time Mature Students in One and Two-Year Programs at Saskatchewan Post-Secondary Institutes.
Hill, Lorraine
Descriptive data about mature, full-time students enrolled in three postsecondary nonuniversity institutes in Saskatchewan, Canada, were gathered. Information was sought about the personal characteristics of these students, about the decision making process they followed when deciding to return to school, and about the difficulties and benefits they encountered upon their return. The 218 respondents were 25 years old and over and were enrolled in one-year and two-year programs. Responses to the questionnaire, which is appended, indicated that there was no single typical profile for the mature student enrolled in these institutes. There were more females than males in the population, they tended to 25 to 29 years old, and were most likely to be enrolled in health science programs. Nearly half the respondents were married and/or had financial dependents. Respondents indicated that the three main reasons for their interval away from school were that they had completed the schooling desired at that time, that they wanted to go to work, or that they were being married or planning marriage. Most commonly mentioned reasons for returning to school were for personal satisfaction, to develop new skills, to get a better job or promotion, and to change careers. More financial assistance was indicated to be the most needed change to facilitate the return of mature full-time students. Differences according to sex, age, and program groupings are described. A literature review, information on the research methodology, and references are included. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Saskatchewan
Note: Thesis presented to the University of Saskatchewan in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Continuing Education.